Doug's Darkworld

War, Science, and Philosophy in a Fractured World.

What the Hell is That? (Number 6 in a series, if you want to guess, don’t read below the image.)

with 8 comments

hexagon

Interesting, nu? I got a lot of guesses on Facebook. A new planet, water going down a  drain, a newly discovered galaxy, and my favourite: a cake mix gone horribly wrong. No, it’s not a cake mix gone horribly wrong. Many people did guess it was some sort of astronomy photo, and they were on track. The white things are indeed clouds, this is the surface of a planet photographed from space. Not Earth though, in fact six Earths could fit inside the hexagon. This is one of the gas giant planets, Saturn. It’s the clouds surrounding the North pole of Saturn. Note the hexagon shaped cloud, what’s up with that?

No one knows. It was first observed when Voyager went by Saturn in 1980 and 1981. No one had a clue then. In 2004, more than 20 years later, the hexagon was still there when the Cassini Probe arrived at Saturn. So it’s a persistent feature. And nothing else like it has been observed anywhere else in the Solar System. Scientists think the hexagon cloud formation is created by a jet stream whipping along at over 200 mph. The hexagon formation rotates with the planet, and its latitude doesn’t change either. Yes, a permanent, or at least remarkably stable, hexagon shaped torrent of wind whipping around Saturn’s pole. Cassini recently has been getting much better pictures of the hexagon lately as Saturn’s northern hemisphere has moved into sunlight, so scientists hope to begin to unravel the mystery soon.

Why so interesting? (Honestly, any reader thinking that has likely long ago abandoned my blog of scientific and historical weirdness in search of blogs about “The Shove.”) The hexagon is interesting from a  number of perspectives. Scientists are interested in it because they can’t yet explain it. That’s kind of the whole point of science. Looking at stuff and figuring out why it is so. This hexagon is one of the big mysteries of the Solar System. It’s an example of no matter how much we know, we are always finding things no one expected or predicted. That’s one of the beauties of the scientific method, knowledge is never complete, and it always has to be modified or expanded in light of new discoveries. Kinda the opposite of most philosophies and religions, that for the most part start with a conclusion and then shoehorn new discoveries into it. That’s getting pretty ridiculous now considering some of these religions started in the Bronze Age. Science put man on the Moon, religion put man on a cross.

Philosophical concerns aside, study of Saturn’s hexagon could prove valuable insights about Earth. This is because the hexagon is a weather and climatic phenomena, and studying how weather and climate works on other planets can prove an interesting comparison to how it works on Earth. And of all the things scientists study, weather and climate are certainly near the top when it comes to practical application. When it comes right down to it, scientific investigation of any topic can yield valuable and practical insights about the world around us. That’s one of the silliest and destructive myths about scientists, that many of them study obscure stuff of no use to anyone. Scientists are studying reality, and everyone is connected to reality. How much more practical can it get?

Personally I just think space exploration is the shiznit. I loved exploring as a kid, and never outgrew it. Go somewhere one hasn’t been, see something one hasn’t seen before. And space exploration is the ultimate place to go and see stuff no one has seen before. “To boldly go where no man has gone before.”  Granted that’s questionable grammar and not exactly a feminist way of phrasing it, but fun none the less. And who knew Leonard Nimoy could play the guitar anyhow? OK, it’s been a long hard week and this is devolving into gibberish. Enough.

Have a great weekend everyone!

(The above image is Public Domain under US copyright law. Well, pretty much so, it’s a NASA image and can’t be used in such a way that indicates NASA supports or endorses the party that uses the image. NASA in no way, shape, or form supports or endorses Doug’s Darkworld. Only my miserable day job does that. On the plus side it keeps me in the right downbeat mood to keep blogging.)

Written by unitedcats

February 22, 2013 at 8:07 am

8 Responses

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  1. Good post Doug, learned something new.

    Josh V

    February 24, 2013 at 3:45 pm

  2. I have seen this before but I’m glad you did a post on it. You’d think there would be more public interest in stuff like this.

    Pyrodin

    February 26, 2013 at 7:33 am

  3. I googled “Saturn Hexagon” fished around the images a bit and came across a science video from Oxford University demonstrating a possible explanation. It involves an experiment with fluid being turned by a disk in a drum. It’s titled “Fluid Clue to Saturn’s Hexagon”. Here is the website: http://www/ox.ac.uk/media/science_blog/100416html

    motorola

    March 7, 2013 at 9:43 am

  4. Okay, a thought just occurred to me: the “disk” doing the stirring in the case of Saturn is the core itself, possibly solid, and since Saturn is the most flattened planet in our system it might well be that the core is shaped more like a round pillow or perhaps one of those weight-thingies used in the sport of curling. Perhaps the hexagon holds the key to the nature of the rings.

    motorola

    March 7, 2013 at 10:01 am

  5. Could most certainly be the shape of the planet below the gas it could have a large oddly shaped mountainous region that causes the gas to flow in such a manner as the planet spins as well.
    Certainly magnetism should also be high on the list of possible causes.

    Apocacrux

    March 15, 2013 at 9:31 am


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